Caught (up) in traffic

Home » Posts tagged 'Maritime transport'

Tag Archives: Maritime transport

TSSP 2021 [27th Annual Conference]

The Transportation Science Society of the Philippines (TSSP) held its 27th Annual Conference last November 19, 2021. Here are the poster and program for the conference:

Poster promoting the conference
The morning part of the conference mainly featured a roundtable discussion.
The afternoon part of the program included 4 technical sessions arranged into 2 parallel sessions.

I initially intended to write about the conference before it was held but things got pretty busy last week so this is a post conference write-up. The organizers also announced the final program late (i.e., just a few days before the conference proper) so it seemed sort of anti climactic to post about it. Nevertheless, the conference proceeded as planned and the TSSP has announced it will be posting the proceedings on their official website. It is not yet there but here’s a link to the TSSP official website: http://ncts.upd.edu.ph/tssp/

A night’s catch

I like going out early and taking a walk along the beach. Aside from the glorious sunrises and the views and sound of the waves, there are always other scenes and experiences that you only get to observe seaside. Among those is witnessing the arrival of fishing boats laden with the night’s catch. The boats are met by the families of the fishermen who help bring in and sort the fish. Here are a few photos from Laiya, Batangas.

Fisherfolk gather and meet the incoming boat carrying the night’s catch.
Some fishes inadvertently fall to the sand and children pitch in by picking them up and placing them in small containers they carry.
Most fish are ‘tamban’ or sardines. There is enough for their families as well as for some to be sold in the market or talipapa.
The nets are removed to be untangled and cleaned. This is a small boat and likely didn’t go to more open waters unlike the bigger, hardy and more weather resistant boats with more powerful engines that allow for wider ranges for fishing.

On local maritime transport

I rarely write about maritime transport so I took this opportunity to take photos of the typical boats used for fishing and transport in the Philippines. Here are a few photos I took one morning in Laiya, Batangas.

Typical outrigger bancas on the beach in Batangas – there are motorised and non-motorised bancas. Most of the motorised kinds use surplus or second-hand car or truck engines customised for the boats. The outriggers provide balance and keep the boats from capsizing.
Typical of the sturdy fishing boats that go out to open seas, these are the types used by fishermen from Zambales who got out to fish for a living in the West Philippine Sea. These are also used for tourism including transporting people to diving or snorkelling areas. Similar boats are used to take people to the staging area for the Underground River in Palawan. Afterwards, they transfer to smaller, non-motorised bancas for the river tour.

More on these bancas soon!

On the DOTr for Public Transport – Maritime Sector

Here’s a continuation of the set of guidelines issued by the Department of Transportation for transport operations for areas that are or will be under the General Community Quarantine (GCQ). Again, I try to refrain from making any critiques or comments, and post this for information and reference.

Ferry ride from Darling Harbor to Cockatoo Island

I had an opportunity to ride the ferries going around Sydney including some of the islands that were part of the attractions of the city. We rode a ferry from Darling Harbor to Cockatoo Island, which used to be for shipbuilding and repairs. It was also historically significant not just because of the ships that were built or repaired there but also because it was used as a correctional facility.

Information and fares – one can get detailed information on ferry services at the wharf and also purchase single trip or top up cards from the machines conveniently located in the area.

Information on the ferry services including the network and use of Opal cards to pay for your fares

One can use the Opal card to take ferry rides. You can top up (reload) at terminals at the wharf

The wharf where we were to await our ferry for Cockatoo Island

Sign showing which ferry lines dock at Wharf 1: F4 is for Circular Quay and F3 is for Parramatta, which includes a stop at Cockatoo Island.

The arrival of our ferry at the port

The cabin was practically empty when we boarded the ferry.

A better look at the spacious cabin

Advisory for all passengers

Ferry layout and safety plan

A view of the bridge and showing the name of the ferry. We discovered that each ferry was named after a prominent female sports figure.

Our ferry ride to Cockatoo Island afforded us splendid views of the waterfront properties and landmarks. The ferry also had few passengers so we could go around the boat to have an appreciation of the sights as well as the vessel itself. I will post some photos of the views from the ferry in a future article.