Caught (up) in traffic

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Monthly Archives: November 2018

On school trip generation

I chanced upon the changing of the shifts for a national high school. This was the time of day when the morning shift students were dismissed (i.e., coming out of school) and the afternoon shift students were coming in.

Students come out of the school to mainly either walk or take public transport (mostly tricycles) to their homes.

Most vehicles give way to people, especially students, crossing the busy street. There are usually traffic aides in the area who help manage traffic and to ensure pedestrians may safely cross or move about.

There are no severe traffic congestion here unlike those generated by many exclusive or private schools. There is actually a private school just beside this public high school that also generates significant private vehicle traffic but somehow manages not to congest this major road that’s part of the L. Sumulong Memorial Circle the way another private school congests Sumulong Highway in the mornings.

Is this simply because of the school being a public school as compared with private schools? Perhaps it is, given the perceived disparity in income classes concerning those going to typical public schools and those going to typical exclusive schools. But income disparity aside, wouldn’t it be possible for most students to just walk or take public transport to school? I actually envy the public school students in the photos above as they can walk to school. And that is because they likely live near the school, which is something that is a desirable situation if public schools are at least at par in quality with the more established private schools (especially the sectarian ones where many parents likely prefer their children to go to). This disparity in quality leads to people residing in relatively long distances away for the preferred schools to travel (often with their private vehicles) to and from the exclusive schools. The point here is that it really is more complicated than what it seems in terms of trip generation.

Laguindingan Airport – departure

I almost forgot to post this item on Laguindingan Airport. It somehow got lost among the many drafts I had already started but remained unfinished. Here is the departure part of the feature on Laguindingan Airport, which is now the major gateway to Northern Mindanao. The layout and design of the airport reminded me of Iloilo’s International Airport what with the spur road, parking lot and driveways that are somewhat similar between the two airports.

Approaching the airport

Parking lot across from the terminal building

Driveway at the departure area – taxis and other PUVs use this driveway

Driveway for private vehicles

Check-in counters

Cebu Pacific counters

Philippine Airlines counters

View of the airline check-in area as we ascend to the departure level via escalator

Pre-departure area

Pre-departure area

Pre-departure area

Shops at the terminal’s pre-departure area

Charging station at the pre-departure area

Not shown in the photos are other shops and restaurants in the pre-departure area including the Seattle’s Best Coffee and Kenny Rogers Roasters. There are also good souvenir items for sale at the many concessionaires at the pre-departure area. Among those to be considered for some last minute shopping are food and beverage items like peanuts, pastries and coffee. There’s also a shop selling meat products, which I highly recommend. They have hams and bacon for sale, which they package well so it survives the trip all the way to your home.

On the viability of bike lanes in the Philippines

I have been inserting topics on complete streets in the undergraduate and graduate courses I teach at university. Some students have also been researching on best practices and designs that they are supposed to apply to real world situations in Philippine cities. The results are still generally mixed but I like how my undergraduate students are able to grasp the concepts and apply them in the short time they have been ‘exposed’ to the concept. I thought my graduate students, most of them practicing engineers, found it more challenging to unlearn many of the things about street design they have learned from their schools including UP and DLSU, which I thought would have the more progressive programs in Civil Engineering.

Here are a couple of helpful articles that explain the business (economic) case for bike lanes. After all, the most persuasive arguments to convince LGUs to take on bike lanes will always be economics or business. That’s also how you can probably convince the business sector to pitch in and lobby for more active transport facilities especially in the downtown areas.

Jaffe, E. (2015) The Complete Business Case for Converting Street Parking Into Bike Lanes, http://www.citylab.com, https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/files/Bicycling_and_the_Economy-Econ_Impact_Studies_web.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2RDPGy52R27zmpOAFVbiEWGZtMSjyr1Z3Kf56oPVoPI6LUfdreDWpBM5E [Last accessed: 11/1/2018]

Flusche, D. (2012) Bicycling Means Business, The economic benefits of bicycle infrastructure, http://www.bikeleague.org, https://bikeleague.org/sites/default/files/Bicycling_and_the_Economy-Econ_Impact_Studies_web.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2RDPGy52R27zmpOAFVbiEWGZtMSjyr1Z3Kf56oPVoPI6LUfdreDWpBM5E [Last accessed: 11/2/2018]

One issue often brought up by opponents of bike lanes is that there are few references for bike lane design and operations in the country. Perhaps the only really comprehensive example is Marikina City though I know for a fact that the last three of their mayors (yes, including the incumbent) is not so keen about their bikeways. In fact, one mayor tried to dissolve the city’s bikeways office only to relent and allow it to exist but under one of its departments. Iloilo City is supposed to have some bike lanes but it is still more like a landscape architecture experiment than a fully functional system (sorry my katilingbans and panggas). And so we look to the more comprehensive experiences abroad for evidences of viability and success. The bottomline here is that I would rather ask how it can succeed here than state why it will not.

Professorial Chair Colloquium of UP’s Institute of Civil Engineering

We start the month of November with an announcement. This is for the Professorial Chair Colloquium of the Institute of Civil Engineering of the University of the Philippines Diliman, which will be held on November 16, 2018 (Friday). The sessions are open to the public and surely there will be interesting topics not just regarding transportation but on the other fields as well. Following are information on the lecture topics: