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Home » Highway Engineering » Road and drainage improvements along Marcos Highway

Road and drainage improvements along Marcos Highway

August 2011
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People driving or commuting from the eastern part of Metro Manila and the towns of Rizal Province have been experiencing traffic congestion for quite some time now due to the civil works associated with the improvement of Marcos Highway. The project is part of the Metro Manila Urban Transportation Integration Project (MMURTRIP) that finally pushed through after failed bids that caused significant delay to its implementation. The major components of the project include road widening and pavement rehabilitation, and the improvement of drainage along the highway. The latter component is quite important as the drainage system is supposed to contribute to the alleviation of flooding in areas along the highway. Who knows if the system could have prevented or at least mitigated the floods brought about by Ketsana (Ondoy) in 2009 if the project had been implemented according to its original schedule?

The photos below were taken during a regular commute along the highway and shows civil works in various stages of completion.

Crane deployed along westbound lane of Marcos Highway – Note the barriers and other equipment that effectively occupy about 2 lanes of the highway and the passengers waiting along the highway.

Partly completed works along Marcos Highway westbound just after the junction with Felix Ave./A. Tuazon Ave. and across from Sta. Lucia Grand Mall 

Civil works along Marcos Highway eastbound in front of the LRT2 Depot in Santolan

Partially completed works along Marcos Highway eastbound just after junction with A. Rodriguez Ave. (Ligaya)

Project equipment and materials and informal barracks along Marcos Highway eastbound near the Barrio Fiesta/Slimmer’s World

Excavations along Marcos Highway eastbound

Due perhaps to the magnitude of the project, traffic congestion along many if not most sections of the highway have been inevitable though prolonged. But partly responsible for the congestion is the Manila Water concessionaire that also did their own civil works at the same time as the DPWH project. As such, the capacity of the highway was significantly reduced with the outer lanes affected by the DPWH project and the inner lanes impacted by Manila Water works.

We should be hopeful though that once the project is completed, traffic flow will greatly improve and flooding may be alleviated along the highway and its catchment area. Works seems to be continuing although there seems to be less people working on the project these days compared to when the project started. Maybe they are just spread out along the highway? The following photos show examples of progress in the civil works.

Demolition work of slab covering drainage along Marcos Highway westbound (before)

Drainage canal covered and pavement engineering works (progress/after)

While it is expected that vehicle flow will be facilitated by the project, it can be said also that this may only encourage more vehicular traffic. As such, perhaps the next project that could be considered for this corridor is the also much-delayed extension of LRT2 towards Masinag.


5 Comments

  1. dimaks says:

    What a loooooong delay indeed. The same thing happened during the construction of the underpass below Mindanao Avenue – Quirino Highway Intersection. Photos here: http://www.skamid.com/news/photos-construction-mindanao/

    A fellow commuter related his story that he had his usual 8-minutes travel converted to 1 HOUR, due to the roadway obstructions.

  2. […] posts on Marcos Highway road works and the resulting congestion did not include photos and discussions on a significant section of the […]

  3. […] along Marcos Highway as 2012 began. I have featured this highway in previous posts first on August 24, 2011, then in September 2, 2011, again in September 13, 2011, and then as late as December 18, 2011, as […]

  4. I wonder how much traffic built up while the project was running. How did you convert the traffic through?

    • d0ctrine says:

      Quite a lot, since the highway is among the 5 most heavily traveled corridors in Metro Manila carrying more than 90,000 vehicles daily. Most people had to endure the inconvenience of daily traffic jams but it has improved today as the project is in its last phase.

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