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Dissertation defense

October 2013
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After a series of posts on my recent travels, here’s something on the serious side:

The oral defense of the dissertations of Ph.D. in Civil Engineering (Major in Transportation Engineering) Program doctoral candidates, Mr. Ernesto B. Abaya (staff/affiliate student/ERDT scholar) and Mr. Alex S. Ladaga (affiliate student/CHED scholar) with topics on transportation & environment and traffic flow theory, respectively, will be on October 21, 2013 (Monday) from 9:00 AM and from 1:00 PM at the National Center for Transportation Studies. Details are shown below:

ERNESTO B. ABAYA
“DEVELOPMENT OF DRIVE CYCLES & ESTIMATION OF FUEL CONSUMPTION FACTORS OF LIGHT DUTY VEHICLES IN METRO MANILA”

21 October, 2013, Monday, 9:00 AM at the Toyota Training Room, NCTS, UP Diliman

Dr. Edwin N. Quiros (UPD-DME), Panel Chair
Dr. Hilario Sean O. Palmiano (UPD-ICE), Panel Member
Dr. J. B. Manuel M. Biona (DLSU-COE), Panel Member
Dr. Karl B. N. Vergel (UPD-ICE), Panel Member (Adviser)
Dr. Ricardo G. Sigua (UPD-ICE), Panel Member (Co-adviser)

Abstract: The urban drive cycles for five different light duty vehicles (LDV) are developed in this study.  Furthermore, the fuel consumption factors for each of the type of LDV are estimated.  The study presents the methodology in the development of the drive cycles in which the speed profile of the specific type of vehicle is surveyed, downloaded and processed.  In the survey of speed data, a Global Positioning System (GPS) device is used as an on-board instrument.  The GPS device is placed on the dashboard of every surveyed vehicle and it recorded instantaneous speed in its memory.  The speed data is downloaded from the device using software provided by the maker of the device (Garmin) called Mapsource. The speed data is processed using a program to execute the methodology in generating candidate drive cycles.  The program creates drive cycles by randomly appending microtrips to form a minimum of twenty minute speed time profile.  Furthermore, along with the generated drive cycle, the program also indicated how it compared with the target drive cycle by computing their individual absolute value difference of their joint speed-acceleration probability distribution. Ten drive cycles for each type of LDV are developed which have absolute value differences less than 20%.  The final drive cycle is selected from the ten (10) candidate drive cycle developed from each type of LDV.  The selected drive cycles are then used in the Vehicle Research and Testing Laboratory at UP College of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering Department, to estimate the fuel consumption factors of each type of light duty vehicle considered.  The developed drive cycles for the different types of light duty vehicles, namely (1) private cars, (2) taxicabs, (3) public utility jeepneys, (4) asian utility vehicles express, and (5) light cargo vehicles have average speeds of 17.97 kph, 13.57 kph, 10.87 kph, 14.69kph and 8.43 kph respectively.  The fuel consumption factors estimated for all the light duty vehicles tested in the chassis dynamometer laboratory ranges from 9 to 12 km/liter.

Keywords:  light duty vehicles, drive cycles, chassis dynamometer laboratory

ALEX S. LADAGA
“EFFECTS OF GAP FORCING ON THE CAPACITY OF TWO LANE ROUNDABOUTS IN THE PHILIPPINES”

21 October, 2013, Monday, 1:00 PM at the Toyota Training Room, NCTS, UP Diliman

Dr. Karl B. N. Vergel (UPD-ICE), Panel Chair
Dr. Jose Regin F. Regidor (UPD-ICE), Panel Member
Dr. Hilario Sean O. Palmiano (UPD-ICE), Panel Member
Dr. Ma. Sheilah G. Napalang (UPD-SURP), Panel Member
Dr. Ricardo G. Sigua (UPD-ICE), Panel Member (Adviser)

Abstract: Traditional method in estimating roundabout capacities using gap acceptance theory involves the assumption that vehicles entering the roundabouts give way to vehicles running along the circulatory road.  Parameters usually used include the critical gap and the follow up times used by the entry vehicles.  Gap forcing persists in local roundabouts and this common Filipino driver behaviour renders the existing models derived from traditional assumptions unsuitable for local applications.  The study embarks on the development of the simulation model which takes into account gap forcing in the estimation of capacity of roundabouts in the Philippines.  It explores the feasibility of introducing more realistic driver behaviour assumptions and the inclusion of additional parameters to come up with a model suitable for local use.

Keywords:  roundabouts, gap forcing, capacity


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