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Home » Highway Engineering » Roads to Baguio: Marcos Highway – Part 1

Roads to Baguio: Marcos Highway – Part 1

August 2016
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In my recent trip to Baguio, I made sure to take new photos of roads particularly the major ones that made that city in the mountains accessible. Of course, one objective was also to have an updated selection for my highway engineering lectures. Following are the first batch of photos I took of Marcos Highway last June 2016. I won’t be writing a caption for many of these photos as well as those in the succeeding batches. I’ll just put these here for others to refer to whether for practical uses or for research.

2016-06-11 11.22.37

2016-06-11 11.23.19I found it unusual to see double yellow along a relatively straight and level section of Marcos Highway. It is perhaps a section where there have been a significant number of road crashes?

2016-06-11 11.23.55There are many roads built to provide access to areas previously uninhabited but now have houses giving some spectacular mountain views.

2016-06-11 11.24.18There are rumble strips along many sections of the highway; seemingly there to wake up travelers that  where getting sleepy. 

2016-06-11 11.24.59It can get quite foggy along the highway

2016-06-11 11.25.16

2016-06-11 11.25.30

2016-06-11 11.25.34 Old barriers look sturdy enough to prevent heavy vehicles from falling off the highway.

2016-06-11 11.25.40One end of the viaduct alongside the mountains

2016-06-11 11.26.00There are communities in many places in the mountains along the highway. Access would be via local roads, some of which are private roads.

2016-06-11 11.26.10I thought perhaps bridges and viaducts in the Philippines should have shoulders and more generous space for pedestrians.

2016-06-11 11.26.24The van in the photo enters the highway from one of the many driveways and local roads connecting to the national highway.

2016-06-11 11.26.34What appears to be a tunnel for many people is actually a roof structure to protect travellers and the road from landslides.

2016-06-11 11.26.51During the day, it is bright inside the structure given the openings along one side of the highway.

2016-06-11 11.27.01The light at the end of the tunnel?

2016-06-11 11.27.30

More photos in Part 2 coming up soon.


1 Comment

  1. Next time I’ll try to take this road! Kennon kasi ako lagi.

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