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Home » Highways and Streets » Roads to Naga City – Lucban

Roads to Naga City – Lucban

September 2011
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The journey to Naga City via the eastern corridor from Quezon City to Rizal and the eastern towns of Laguna eventually led us to Quezon. For this post, I will feature mainly photos of roads in Lucban and will reserve shots of Tayabas, Lucena and the coastal roads of southeastern Quezon in future posts.

Arch welcoming travelers to Lucban – the structure is quite simple compared to other arches I’ve seen along national roads. The section from Luisiana to Lucban also features good pavement complemented by standard signs and markings. The scenery is also nice with the highway being tree-lined and you can open you windows to take a breath of cool fresh air.

Section leading to Lucban town proper has a good view of Mt. Banahaw.  The mountain is famous for its mystical reputation. It is also well-known for being the headquarters of the New People’s Army’s Banahaw command.

Another view of Mt. Banahaw from the national highway with a view of the countryside. Most towns along this stretch of the national highway are dependent on agriculture.

This narrow street is actually part of the national road that’s well within Lucban town proper. There are no sidewalks, much on-street parking. and tricycles and motorcycles actively mingling with through traffic. Notice the bus already encroaching upon the lane for opposing traffic. Note, too, the two pedestrians (one is a child) walking along the carriageway with a tricycle right behind them.

Narrow side street – Lucban is an old town and has many narrow streets that has changed very little in the past years. Since there are no significant traffic and a few have garages, many vehicles are just parked along the roads.

Another side street  in Lucban town leading to the old church and plaza. The town is structured similar to most old towns around the Philippines, with the center being the plaza that is surrounded by the church, the municipal hall and the marketplace.

Close call – as if to demonstrate just how narrow the national road was, a truck and bus squeeze slowly past each other.

After exiting the town proper, the traveler is again treated to rural scenes like farmers on horseback. While roads are generally of good condition, shoulders are practically just clear spaces along the roadside. Often, there are structures such as houses encroaching upon the ROW.

Many road sections between Lucban and Tayabas are on rolling terrain. This necessitates combinations of horizontal and vertical curves that can be quite hazardous to speeding motorists. Note that there are no shoulders and signs are usually lacking or obscured.

Next: Tayabas


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