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More bikeways please!

August 2013
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After the construction of  a bikeways network in Marikina City, the city became a poster child for sustainable transport in the Philippines. The bikeways was initiated with assistance from the World Bank for the pilot route and was later expanded by the city under the leadership of its Mayors, the former MMDA Chair Bayani Fernando and his wife Marides Fernando. The bikeways were promoted as a good practice example for non-motorized transport (NMT), with the National Center for Transportation Studies (NCTS) of the University of the Philippines Diliman involving the Marikina City Bikeways Office (MCBO) in its studies and advocacy work on Environmentally Sustainable Transport (EST).

IMG06409-20130713-0951Bikeways between pedestrian walkway (red pavement) and parking slots in Marikina City.

Acad Oval 2Bike lane along the Academic Oval at UP Diliman in Quezon City.

IMG03425-20120707-0831Bike lane integrated into the sidewalks along Marcos Highway in the cities of Marikina, Pasig and Antipolo.

IMG05323-20130121-1142Bike lanes (red pavement) in Malate, Manila.

IMG06119-20130531-1027Bike lanes integrated with the sidewalks along Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City.

IMG06120-20130531-1027Bike lanes integrated with the sidewalks along Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City.

This is obviously not a comprehensive list of bike lanes and bike ways in the Philippines. I am sure there are similar projects in other cities and I am aware that cycling is becoming more popular around the country. These are but examples of what has been accomplished so far and it is clear that we need to do more to promote cycling not just as a sport or for recreation but, more importantly, as a means for commuting. Integrating cycling into one’s daily routine is a healthy and money-saving option, and segregated bikeways and bike lanes ensure the safe travels for cyclists. This, of course, is in consideration of the little respect cyclists (and pedestrians) get from motorists who believe road space is theirs alone.


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